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The following posts are related to behavioral finance. Scroll down to see more articles.

Are index funds the next market ‘bubble’?

While bear markets are inevitable, will their impact be exacerbated by the growth of passive index funds—and the accompanying “madness of crowds”? One of the fun aspects of having children is re-exposure to some great kid-friendly literature. In a...

Explaining the (mis)behavior of markets

Does fractal mathematics offer a better way to understand market risk? The traditional test of understanding how something works is to take it apart and then rebuild it. If the clock still keeps time afterward, there is a good likelihood that the...

Risky business

How can advisors build a more meaningful investor behavioral profile? The long-lasting effects of the Great Recession It is hardly news that many investors remain permanently scarred by the credit crisis of 2007 to 2009. Many research studies since have...

A case for active tactical investing

Lessons from behavioral economics and fractal mathematics theory can help explain why tactical investment strategies can be beneficial in portfolio construction. Editor’s note: Dennis Yamasaki has an extensive educational background in quantitative...

Why goals-based investing makes sense

Financial advisors and investment managers use 21st-century tools to help clients achieve “real” investment success. Financial advisors who use fee-based managed accounts can more effectively help clients meet their investment objectives if they...

They’ve got it backward!

Should buy-and-hold investors be more active and active investors more patient? It was 1969, and my favorite Michigan-area radio station was WKNR. One deejay, Russ Gibb, got a call from a college student saying there was a hidden verse in the Beatles’...

Buy and fold

The only investment approach investors should consider is one they will actually follow. Millions of Americans follow what has become traditional advice to “buy and hold.” This approach might be best summarized by John Bogle, founder of The Vanguard...

Why smart clients do dumb things

Highly intelligent people are often susceptible to making poor investing decisions—behavioral research offers some clues why History books are full of examples of faulty thinking by some of the most intelligent people of their time. News articles remind...

A New Year’s resolution for every investor

Understand how
 diversification should work. The holiday season came and went in a blur, just as it always seems to do. But we are left with fond memories of celebration with family and friends, not to mention the many occasions for traditional...

Helping clients climb down the mountain

Behavioral research has documented many of the obstacles that trip up self-directed investors—the first step in gaining knowledge is often one of self-awareness. As financial advisors, we wear many hats: detective, analyst, strategist, architect,...

Is it possible to just say no to volatility?

Equity investments as an asset class have historically produced the greatest returns over time, but the process is often stressful for investors and their financial advisors. Could a simple tactic allow investors to “just say no” to volatility? Stock...